Ford On Food artwork

Ford On Food

51 episodes - English - Latest episode: almost 8 years ago -

Jason Ford has over 25 years of extensive experience in the food service industry. He is a professional chef, qualified commercial cookery lecturer, published food writer and culinary entertainer.

Visit http://fordonfood.com.au/

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Episodes

Episode 52: Turning A New Leaf

August 14, 2016 03:19 - 2 minutes

Sometimes referred to as ‘Chinese parsley’ or ‘cilantro’ – coriander is a native herb of the Middle East and Southern Europe. However, it has also been popular throughout Asia for thousands of years. It grows wild in Egypt and the Sudan, and surprisingly can also be found growing wild in English fields. Most Australians would recognise coriander as an ingredient regularly used in Thai cuisine. The pungent tasting fresh green leaves almost look like the leaves of parsley, but with more of ...

Episode 51: Spice of Life

August 13, 2016 10:39 - 2 minutes

My wife is of Hungarian and German heritage. Growing up, she relished visits to her Grandfather’s home to indulge in all manner of Hungarian culinary delights. The corner-stone of this Central European cuisine is a distinctive blend of spices – of which paprika is ‘King’. There are very few aromas that beat the combination of onion, garlic and paprika frying in a pan. This simple combination of ingredients results in a depth of savoury flavour that is uniquely Hungarian. Paprika is the nam...

Episode 50: The Sweet and the Sour

September 06, 2015 10:09 - 2 minutes

Balsamic vinegar is very popular, due to it’s rich, sweet characteristics. It features prominently in many Italian recipes. It is so sweet in fact that it can also be used in desserts. Unlike most vinegar, Balsamic vinegar is not derived from wine but from newly pressed grape juice. In its most traditional form, balsamic vinegar is made from the Trebbiano grape, which flourishes in the Modena region of Italy. It is aged by transferring between barrels made from oak, chestnut, juniper or ...

Episode 48: Sweet Succulent Sea Scallops

September 06, 2015 05:39 - 2 minutes

Scallops are named after the fanned, fluted appearance of their shell. They are categorised as a bivalve mollusc. There is hundreds of species found throughout the waters of the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Pacific Oceans. The closer you live to the ocean, the better your chances of purchasing scallops still alive – but in most cases they are sold already shucked (removed from the shell) and frozen. The reason for this is that scallops deteriorate quickly when removed from the sea and afte...

Episode 48: Whip It Good

September 05, 2015 11:37 - 2 minutes

Pavlova wouldn’t be half the experience without lashings of whipped cream. And, in the absence of whipped cream an ice-cream sundae would be just… a bowl of ice-cream. People have been whipping cream in Europe for centuries, and now-days it has found its way into the cuisines of most cultures. But, whipping cream is not quite as straight forward as you may think, there is some important science involved in the process. To begin with, pure cream has to contain at least 30% fat or it will be...

Episode 47: Dodging Bunya Nuts

September 05, 2015 08:32 - 2 minutes

A few years back, while picnicking at the Bunya Mountains, one of my children was almost hit by a bowling ball sized Bunya cone, which hurtled to Earth faster than the speed of sound. It exploded into the ground, making a crater before rolling down the hill into our picnic blanket. Good thing my son had just moved away seconds earlier. Bunya nuts are one of Australia’s greatest indigenous bush foods. They are large almond shaped nuts that grow in tight cones, on giant rainforest pine trees ...

Episode 46: Life Is Sweet

September 05, 2015 07:47 - 2 minutes

Sugar could be described as a pure carbohydrate, used all around the world to sweeten food. Most people are unaware of how many varieties of sugar are available. Conventional sugar is mainly obtained from the juice of sugar cane, but can also be made from the sucrose of the sugar beet. There are alternative sweeteners such as bee’s honey, date sugar, palm sugar and maple sugar (obtained from maple tree sap). And of course, there are countless sugar substitutes, from the highly artificia...

Episode 45: A Taste For Olives

April 11, 2015 05:04 - 2 minutes

My first taste of olives was on vacation, as a young teenager. Shortly after taking off from Bahrain Airport, I was served lunch of assorted cheese, Middle Eastern style meats and (in my youthful ignorance) what I thought was a couple of black grapes. The grapes happened to be black olives and with revulsion I impulsively spat one out and it landed at the feet of an airline steward. Embarrassed, I cried out, “There’s something wrong with that grape”, only to have the steward laugh at me. ...

Episode 44: Holy Passionfruit

January 01, 2015 08:39 - 2 minutes

The passionfruit is an elongated oval or round fruit which originates from Central America. The two most common varieties are – the yellow or purple kind. The name ‘Passion’ is not referring to love. The fruit is named after its flower, which is in fact a reference to the Passion of Christ, on the Crucifix. Centuries ago, Spanish priests adopted the passion flower as a symbol of Crucifixion. The outer layer, made of 72 colourful, fine petals represents the Crown of Thorns; the 10 larger ...

Episode 43: The Hip Fruit

December 30, 2014 00:38 - 2 minutes

Limes must be one of the world’s most hip citrus fruits. Demand for varieties like Tahitian and Kaffir has built up enormously over the last decade or so, probably because Asian cooking is so popular. There are several common varieties grown: Tahitian Lime is a very juicy fruit and grows all year round. When ripe they are a seedless green fruit – however they can be left on the tree to turn yellow, which makes them softer, juicier and a little sweeter. Wild Finger Lime is a long, narrow fr...

Episode 42: Creamy Heaven

December 28, 2014 06:34 - 2 minutes

There aren’t many cheeses that are as heavenly, soft, rich and creamy as Camembert cheese – besides Brie of course. People often can’t tell the difference between Brie and Camembert. The irony is that there isn’t actually much of a difference. They were both originally made by monks – just in different regions of France. Camembert is classified as a soft-rind cow’s milk cheese. It has a velvety, white mould rind with a pale yellow interior. As the cheese ripens the creamy smooth pâté bu...

Episode 41: Christmas Rules

December 19, 2014 05:06 - 2 minutes

The festive decorations adorning our retail stores are a stark reminder that Christmas day is just around the corner. For many it’s a time to gather with family and friends. My family has rotating roster that dictates who will be hosting Christmas lunch. My wife and I are both chefs, so we at least have to put in half an effort when it’s our turn to host. So we follow some basic rules for planning: My wife makes the rules, which she can change without notice. Don’t leave planning to the ...

Episode 40: Feeling Blue?

December 19, 2014 03:27 - 2 minutes

I personally don’t think blueberries are actually true blue. They are kind of a dusty indigo colour on the outside and mainly white or pale green on the inside. That said, they are as blue as a food is ever going to get. Most people are unaware there are many varieties, and around the globe blueberries are known by differing names. In northern England they are often called Whineberry, and in other parts of the UK Whortleberries. In America they can also be referred to as Bilberries or Huc...

Episode 39: Bring Home The Bacon

April 02, 2014 22:44 - 2 minutes

Bacon is the main reason why I’ve never become a vegetarian. I think bacon is one of the most extraordinarily delicious foods known to humankind. Although I’d agree that bacon does go with just about everything, I wouldn’t recommend eating it to excess as it contains a large amount of sodium and fat. Bacon is made from various cuts of pork (generally the belly) which is cured in a liquid brine or dry salt packed. Then it is commonly infused and showered with liquid smoke and baked. The mo...

Episode 38: Plum Crazy

March 06, 2014 10:00 - 2 minutes

A plum is a type of ‘Drupe Fruit’, which means they have a leathery skin, surrounding soft flesh which is attached to a hard stone (pit). Therefore, it falls into the same category as peach, apricot, cherries and nectarines. Depending on who you talk to, some may claim there are thousands of plum species. I personally find that hard to believe – I’ve seen many different types in my cooking career, and I reckon there are probably only several dozen varieties. They all have smooth skin, unl...

Episode 37: Spilt Milk

February 27, 2014 13:23 - 2 minutes

I have a love/hate relationship with milk. I love to use it in cooking. But personally, I hate the bloated feeling I get after drinking it. So I’ve now turned to soy milk and almond milk, which seems better (for me anyway). And I also drink my coffee black as a straight shot of espresso. As a chef I would be lost without milk, as it’s an essential ingredient in many of my favourite recipes. However, for some time I’ve been questioning whether humans should be consuming something that is r...

Episode 36: Tarty Lemon

February 18, 2014 08:02 - 2 minutes

I always find it funny to see a child try a lemon for the first time. Their face puckers-up like they’re about to implode. Lemons are an oval, bright yellow fruit and a member of the citrus family. They are packed with vitamin C and are great for fighting off scurvy on those long voyages to distant lands. In fact, in the early 1800’s the British Navy spiked their sailor’s rum rations with lemon or lime juice. The most common varieties available today (yes there is more than one), are Lis...

Episode 34: Spring A Leek

February 02, 2014 03:01 - 2 minutes

Leeks are a vegetable that belongs to the same family as onions. It is widely assumed they are descendant of the wild onions that grow all over the European countryside. Leeks are a long cylinder shaped stalk of tightly packed leaf layers. They vary in both length and thickness depending on the age of the plant. The immature leek is sold as ‘Baby leek’ and is often pencil thin, while the mature plant can be as thick as a broom handle. They’re white at the base where they have been covere...

Episode 33: Coconut Face

January 11, 2014 11:38 - 2 minutes

I first experienced fresh coconuts as a child when visiting Cairns in far North Queensland., Australia. They were in abundance, lying on the ground at the base of coconut palms everywhere – very reminiscent to their native origins on the coastal regions of the Caribbean, South-east Asia and India. The name coconut is derived from the Spanish word for ‘grotesque face’ , because of the three dimples on its surface, which the Spanish thought resembles a monkey head. I personally think that’s n...

Episode 32: Food Of The Gods

January 10, 2014 06:27 - 2 minutes

I once read that it was discovered in pottery jars from Egyptian tombs. And although crystallised, it was still edible. Honey was used around the world as a sweetener well before the introduction of sugar. The Ancient Greeks used it in many bakery products and considered it ‘The Food of the Gods’ and many of these ancient recipes are still used today, particularly throughout Europe. Honey could be described as a thick, sweet liquid made by bees from the nectar of flowers. The nectar passes...

Episode 31: Those Eggs Are Fishy!

January 05, 2014 09:54 - 2 minutes

It’s one of those Hollywood things – we often associate foods like lobster and caviar with the fabulously wealthy upper-class. After-all, in movies we see millionaires in tuxedoes being served silver platters of caviar with glasses of champagne. So it’s no surprise that caviar has been given a bad rap with the average Joe. Plus, the thought of eating fish eggs doesn’t always go down well with most people. Truth be told, caviar isn’t all that bad! In brief, caviar is the salted roe of certa...

Episode 30: Out Of The Blue

January 04, 2014 06:33 - 2 minutes

It’s a fact of life, not everybody likes blue vein cheese. It can be an acquired taste. Many people I know absolutely hate it. However, when I was kid I can’t recall anybody liking blue vein cheese. So, obviously there has been a culinary or cultural change in Australia over recent years. I also think there has been a change in the availability and assortment of blue vein cheese in the marketplace. If you look back a few decades, there were mainly the very strong, acidic and crumbly varie...

Episode 29: For Starters

January 03, 2014 12:48 - 2 minutes

The word antipasto is derived from the Italian ante, which means ‘before’ and pasto which means ‘meal’. Antipasto is traditionally a selection of hot or cold appetisers served at the beginning of and Italian meal. The most typical antipasti (plural) items could include various table olives, cheese, pickled vegetables, cured meats, salamis, cold fish, frittata, fresh or sun dried tomatoes and anchovies. In most of the regional areas of Italy, antipasto will consist of vegetable and meat ite...

Episode 28: Mysterious Microwaves

November 25, 2013 07:06 - 2 minutes

I don’t like microwave ovens. It’s a hate-hate relationship. Therefore I have no advice for you on the subject. Regardless of what magical tricks the manufacturer will claim their nuclear gadget can do, I would never use a microwave to cook something. They do have some limited use, to defrost small frozen food items, or to melt butter (maybe). But even then, they regularly over-heat; burn and half cook the food. With all the buttons, dials, beeps, bells and digital displays found on a micr...

Episode 27: The Culinary 'X' Factor

November 21, 2013 09:02 - 2 minutes

One of the first skills a professional chef will learn is the production of ‘Mirepoix’. It’s correctly pronounced ‘meer-pwa’ because the ‘x’ is silent. I can’t help but smile when someone pronounces it ‘miri-pocks’. Mirepoix is a French term used to describe a mixture of aromatic vegetables which impart their flavour into stocks, sauces, stews or braises. Vegetables, such as onions, carrots and celery are roughly cut up and slowly cooked into a recipe to improve its flavour. They are often...

Episode 26: Going Bananas

October 25, 2013 05:38 - 2 minutes

Unfortunately for me, I can’t eat raw bananas without upsetting my stomach. There is something in them (maybe tannin) that makes my feel unwell. I’m also too unfit to swing from trees – so I would make a lousy monkey. I can however eat cooked bananas, so if you have a similar intolerance, try them barbecued or fried with caramelised sugar and rum. Or maybe diced and cooked in pancakes. Bananas are one of the oldest cultivated fruits and have been eaten by humans in places like India and As...

Episode 25: The Squash Racket

October 25, 2013 05:18 - 2 minutes

I’ve discovered over the years that there can be some confusion categorising squash, depending on where you live in the world. There is a whole range of vegetables that belong to the ‘Marrow’ family. They include squash, melons, cucumbers, gourds, marrows (zucchinis) and pumpkins. The general rule is that squash that grow in winter time have thick skin and hard flesh, while summer squash has softer skin and wetter flesh. In Australia, when someone goes shopping for Summer Squash, they are ...

Episode 24: Sushi For Beginners

October 17, 2013 10:17 - 2 minutes

My love affair with Sushi began in the mid 90s when I worked as a Pastry Chef in a large hotel. The establishment had a Japanese Restaurant called Kabuki. I would smuggle the Japanese Sushi Chef’s desserts as a trade for their sushi and tempura. I became hopelessly addicted. Eventually, my obsession became so overwhelming, I convinced the Sushi Chefs to show me how they were made, so I could make them myself at home. I quickly discovered that Sushi is incredibly easy to make. And, although I ...

Episode 23: The Culinary Quiet Achiever

October 17, 2013 10:00 - 2 minutes

It’s one of the most humble and least glamorous vegetables on Earth; however most cuisines would be unrecognisable without them. Onions have a long and colourful past, and are probably one of oldest culinary ingredients in human history. Egyptian hieroglyphics and artwork tell the story of how onions where purchased at great expense to feed the slave workforce and keep them physically healthy and motivated while building the pyramids. Countless religious writings, scriptures and historical...

Episode 22: Artichokes 101

October 11, 2013 11:32 - 2 minutes

There are three varieties of artichoke – the Globe, the Jerusalem and the Chinese artichoke. The most common of which is the ‘Globe’. The globe artichoke is in fact, an unopened flower bud of a perennial of the thistle group of the sunflower family and is believed to be a native of the Mediterranean and the Canary Islands. If the bud is allowed to open, it blossoms as a brilliant violet-blue flower about 7 inches in diameter. Artichokes are available all year round, but peek in spring and aut...

Episode 21: Stalking Season

October 09, 2013 07:18 - 2 minutes

Asparagus stalks are the young spear-shaped shoots obtained from a perennial plant native to both Europe and Western Asia. It is a member of the lily family and thousands of years has been eaten as a vegetable. The most common variety is harvested when it is above ground and exposed to photosynthesis. White asparagus is obtained by cutting the shoots before they break the surface of the ground or they are grown in darkness; therefore they lack the deep chlorophyll green (they just need a sunt...

Episode 20: Perilous Prawns

October 07, 2013 06:20 - 2 minutes

I’ve discovered over the years there are just as many people claiming to be allergic to prawns, as those who can’t get enough of them. The allergic effect ranges from mild skin irritation, to claims of instant death at the mere sight of a prawn. Most cases of seafood allergy would be quite legitimate, and in some cases rather dangerous. Even my wife has had allergic reactions to them. Although, recently she’s discovered that after incorporating prawns into a meal and thorough cooking, she can...

Episode 19: The Things I've Burnt

September 30, 2013 01:54 - 2 minutes

Cooking is a process of applying heat to a food item to increase palatability, to enhance flavour, tenderise, caramalise and even kill off bacteria. Unfortunately this simple process can rapidly and dramatically turn into a disaster of Titanic proportions. As experienced as I may be in the kitchen, I’m still capable of destroying food. And the most common disaster I have is getting distracted and burning things. But it doesn’t just stop at burning the food. I have burnt myself too many times ...

Episode 18: Yeast At Least

September 29, 2013 03:22 - 2 minutes

As I write this article, I’ve got a batch of fresh bread dough on-the-prove. Which means the yeast in the dough is having a great time eating up sugars and starch and converting them into alcohol and bubbles of carbon dioxide. These little gas bubbles get trapped in the sticky bread dough and cause the bread to expand like a balloon.. In brief technical terms, yeast is a single-celled living organism. It is classified as a fungus. Yeast is a wonderful friend to all people who love baking. How...

Episode 17: Why Peel A Tomato?

September 25, 2013 03:01 - 2 minutes

Now you may ask, “Why would you want to peel a tomato”? The short answer is that tomato skin is often leathery. And, it’s my job as a chef to make the customers dining experience a pleasurable one. So, for certain dishes (such as pasta sauce) the tomato skin just has to go. Hasta la vista, baby! Step 1) Get a pot of water to a rolling boil. Step 2) Cut a cross into the bottom of the ripe tomato, just through the skin. This will give the skin a place to start coming off later on. Step 3) This...

Episode 16: Aubergine

September 09, 2013 05:55 - 2 minutes

Often referred to as ‘eggplant’, Aubergine is commonly used as a vegetable, but it’s actually as a fruit, related to tomatoes and potatoes. In fact, the fruit itself is botanically classified as a berry. And, believe it or not, the aubergine plant is a close relative of the tobacco plant. Originating in South East Asia, the aubergine is also widely used in Italian, Mediterranean, French and Middle Eastern cuisines. There are many varieties of aubergine – some are small pea shaped and some are...

Episode 15: Lack Culture? Eat Yoghurt

August 28, 2013 07:28 - 2 minutes

Somebody once told me, “Jason…the closest you’ll ever get to culture, is yoghurt”. Pretty harsh comment really, but I think I deserved it at the time. It comes as a surprise to some people that less than one percent of all bacteria on earth are dangerous to humans. The ones that cause food poisoning are called pathogens; a lot of the other bacteria are quite useful in food production. Imagine a world without beer, wine, cheese, vegemite, penicillin or yoghurt. You’d rather live on the moon – ...

Episode 14: The Raw And The Cooked

August 24, 2013 11:38 - 2 minutes

It seems to me that most people are repulsed by the thought of eating fresh raw oysters. A taste for oysters ‘a la natural’ is an acquired taste, best developed at a young age but certainly obtainable later in life. I personally hadn’t seen a fresh oyster until I became an apprentice chef. I’d eaten the tinned cooked variety plenty of times, but there is simply no substitute for fresh. Ok, I admit the texture of a fresh raw oyster is slimy, gooey and challenging to say the least (there’s comp...

Episode 13: The Breakfast Club

August 24, 2013 10:53 - 2 minutes

If you love a good breakfast… then join the club. For two thirds of the year, my family and I spend brekky time out on the verandah in the fresh morning air. Sometimes I even crank up the barbecue to cook our bacon and eggs. Although I usually look for healthy options, I just worship an indulgent breakfast. So, what kinds of breakfast menus are there? Here are some popular choices: Full Breakfast – was made popular by the English, and has a lot of traditional cooked fair like eggs, meats, s...

Episode 12: Boiling Point

August 24, 2013 09:52 - 2 minutes

You often hear the term “I can’t even boil water!” when somebody describes their lack of confidence in the kitchen. Although this statement is generally said in jest, it isn't necessarily far from the truth. There are several different cooking methods requiring food to be submerged in hot liquid, and it’s worth understanding the science behind them. Boiling – would have to be the easiest method of cookery, normally water is used and cooking time is short. Controlling the heat is simple as b...

Episode 11: Red As A Beetroot

July 14, 2013 08:28 - 2 minutes

The beetroot is a root vegetable, which originated in Germany. It made its way to the Mediterranean in the fifteenth century and is now cultivated all over the world. It was originally grown for its leaves that can be cooked like spinach or used fresh in salads. However, the large bulbous root is now used more often. There is several species of beetroot, ranging from a dark purple-red, to a golden or white variety. There is also an Italian beetroot called ‘Chioggio’ with alternating rings of ...

Episode 10: The Bachelor's Food Guide

July 09, 2013 11:07 - 2 minutes

CANNED GOODS: Any canned goods that have bloated to the size or shape of a cricket ball should be disposed of – very carefully! CARROTS: A carrot that you can tie in a knot in is not fresh. DIPS: If you can take it out of its container and bounce it on the floor, it has gone bad. DAIRY: Milk is spoiled when it starts to look like yoghurt. Yoghurt is spoiled when it starts to look like cottage cheese. Cottage cheese is spoiled when it starts to look like regular cheese. Regular cheese is nothi...

Episode 9: The Alfalfa Experiment

June 09, 2013 02:35 - 2 minutes

I've learnt heaps from my kids various science experiments. My daughter once grew alfalfa. The instructions on the pack of seeds read “Grow your own edible natural sprouts in just 3-6 days”. The seeds went in jar with a little water and covered with cloth. Much like a Harry Potter spell, hey presto we were eating alfalfa four days later. The only home science experiment I ever did as a child was to hide my uneaten school lunch under my bed. A week later, a Jurassic forest of fuzzy mould and a...

Episode 8: Eat With Your Eyes

June 02, 2013 04:44 - 2 minutes

It is a fact that people eat with their eyes first. As a chef, I will not get a second opportunity to make a first impression with my customers. A sloppy or badly presented meal will reflect on the customer’s impression of the establishment and will set the mood for the rest of their dining experience. When I’m invited to dinner by friends or family, they regularly apologies for the way they have presented their meals. Personally, I’m just happy someone’s doing the cooking instead of me. Of c...

Episiode 7: Eat Your Grits

May 19, 2013 02:39 - 1 minute

Polenta is made from finely ground cornmeal (dried corn) and is similar to the courser dish Americans refer to as ‘Grits’. It can be purchased in either a yellow or white colour. When slowly cooked in a liquid, such as water, cornmeal becomes a thick porridge-like mixture called polenta. Polenta makes an interesting and healthy substitute for mashed potato or steamed rice. I personally love eating polenta with grilled sausages, or stews. Cheesy Polenta Bring 1Lt of milk to the boil. Graduall...

Episode 6: A Little Bit Fishy

May 05, 2013 09:37 - 2 minutes

It’s one of those things. Either you love or loathe anchovies. Many a disagreement has erupted over the inclusion (or exclusion) of anchovies on a pizza. I love anchovies, and I can’t put it any more bluntly – I LOOOOVE them! For me, pizza is an excuse to eat anchovies. Caesar salad is an excuse to eat anchovies. And, anchovies are an excuse to eat anchovies. When I bite into a fishy, salty anchovy fillet, it’s as close as I can get to gastronomic heaven. There are some important things that ...

Episode 5: The Perfect Steak

April 02, 2013 03:14 - 1 minute

As I promised in my last podcast, here’s some brief advice on how to achieve the perfect steak: 1.Don’t cook a cold steak. Take it out of the fridge 20 minutes before cooking to remove some of the chill. You are more likely to achieve the right degree of cooking if the steak is closer to room temperature to begin with, but always consider hygiene. 2.The steak must be placed on a very hot surface (pan or grill) that begins to sizzle immediately on contact. If the heat is too low, the steak wil...

Episode 4: Medium Well

April 01, 2013 07:27 - 2 minutes

I’ve had customers describe the degree they’d like their steaks cooked in countless ways, including ‘Still Mooing’ and ‘Cremated’. I’ll always oblige the request of a customer, because the customer pays my wage. However, there are some widely held misconceptions about the ‘degree of doneness’ in steaks. To start with, the red liquid that flows from a cooking steak is ‘sarcoplasm’ (not blood), and the pink colour of cooked meat is the remaining pigmentation. Blood is drained from the animal at...

Episode 3: The Great Watermelon Heist

January 17, 2013 02:13 - 2 minutes

When I was a youngster, I swiped a watermelon from a neighbor’s property. I stealthily crawled under his barbed wire fencing behind his chook shed, and with military precision pinched the biggest melon I could roll back to my yard. With great difficulty, I hoisted the melon into my tree house and greedily ate my prize. This was soon followed by a monster belly ache from Hell, and the following day my neighbor warned me that if he ever saw me pilfer one of his melons again, he’d set the dogs o...

Episode 2: English Style Pickled Onions

January 06, 2013 05:29 - 2 minutes

1kgsmall pickling onions, peeled 50gsalt 1Ltwhite vinegar 10black peppercorns 10small red chilies 5bay leaves 200gwhite sugar (1)Place the onions and salt in a bowl and stir until onions are thoroughly coated. Cover and place in the refrigerator overnight. (2)Wash the salt off the onions and dry with paper towel. (3)In a saucepan, heat the vinegar, spices and sugar until sugar is completely dissolved, no need to boil. (4)Tightly pack sterilized jars to the top with onions and pour over the v...

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