Town Hall Seattle Civics Series artwork

Town Hall Seattle Civics Series

292 episodes - English - Latest episode: 5 days ago - ★★★★ - 11 ratings

The Civics series at Town Hall shines a light on the shifting issues, movements, and policies, that affect our society, both locally and globally. These events pose questions and ideas, big and small, that have the power to inform and impact our lives. Whether it be constitutional research from a scholar, a new take on history, or the birth of a movement, it's all about educating and empowering.

Society & Culture News politics civics community education government growth history ideas movements national
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Episodes

235. Virtual Civic Cocktail: The State of Our Democracy – Next Steps for the Democratic Party

May 13, 2021 04:45 - 57 minutes - 53.4 MB

What’s ahead for Republicans, Democrats, and Independents when it comes to civics in our country and communities? How can we work together when parties are often divided themselves? This April Civic Cocktail continues an intended multi-part, multi-party series begun in February. With a new administration in the White House, local leaders discuss the next steps for the Democratic Party in D.C., bridging the political divide, and how their national work impacts communities here in Washingt...

234. Kerry Killinger and Linda Killinger with Enrique Cerna: How the Last Financial Crisis Informs Today

May 05, 2021 23:42 - 59 minutes - 55.7 MB

In 2008, the American economy collapsed, taking with it millions of Americans’ jobs, homes, and life savings. The ensuing financial crisis was devastating, and many are still feeling its effects today. But despite the crisis, the US government has yet to implement policies that would prevent a repeat of the Great Recession. Why is that? Kerry Killinger, the former CEO of Washington Mutual Bank, and Linda Killinger, the former vice chair of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Des Moines, joine...

233. Nicholas Freudenberg and Mark Bittman: Modern Capitalism and the Future of Health

April 28, 2021 18:47 - 54 minutes - 51.1 MB

Freedom of choice lies at the heart of American society. Every day, individuals decide what to eat, which doctors to see, who to connect with online, and where to educate their children. Yet, many Americans don’t realize that these choices are illusory at best. By the start of the 21st century, every major industrial sector in the global economy was controlled by no more than five transnational corporations, and in about a third of these sectors, a single company accounted for more than 40...

232. Alec MacGillis with Margaret O’Mara: Winning and Losing in One-Click America

April 22, 2021 21:36 - 57 minutes - 53.5 MB

In 1937, the famed writer and activist Upton Sinclair published a novel bearing the subtitle A Story of Ford-America. He blasted the callousness of a company worth “a billion dollars” that underpaid its workers while forcing them to engage in repetitive and sometimes dangerous assembly line labor. Eighty-three years later, the market capitalization of Amazon. com has exceeded one trillion dollars, while the value of the Ford Motor Company hovers around thirty billion. We have, Alec MacGillis...

231. Christopher Sebastian Parker with Lance Bennett and Kenan Block: What the Attack on the Capitol Means for the Future of American Democracy

April 16, 2021 04:05 - 1 hour - 56.8 MB

On January 5, the run-off election in Georgia flipped the state and created opportunity for a Democrat-led Senate. On January 6, armed insurrectionists stormed the United States Capitol Building, resulting in dozens of injuries and several fatalities. UW Professor Christopher Sebastian Parker believes that Donald Trump as chief executive was making matters worse. Yet despite Trump no longer being in office, there seems to be reticence to reckon with the true impact of the actions on January ...

230. Virtual Civic Cocktail—The State of Our Democracy: Bridging the Political Divide in WA

April 07, 2021 23:01 - 59 minutes - 55.7 MB

Many believe that partisan politics has created a roadblock in efforts to reach across the aisle and forge ahead. Nationally, the chasm separating Democrats and Republicans can be felt to be vast, but what about here in Washington state? Is it possible that similar divisive politics could be holding up progress beneficial to all? If so, what are recommendations for characteristics and qualities needed in future leaders to govern more effectively? Join Town Hall Seattle and Seattle CityClub...

229. Abdul El-Sayed and Micah Johnson: A Citizen’s Guide to Medicare for All

March 31, 2021 23:19 - 55 minutes - 52.1 MB

The coronavirus pandemic reignited a debate that has been raging for years: healthcare. There are few issues as consequential in the lives of Americans as healthcare. Every single American will interact with the healthcare system, and most people will find that interaction less than satisfactory. And yet for every dollar spent in our economy, 18 cents goes to healthcare, leaving many to ask: what are we paying for, exactly? Doctors Abdul El-Sayed and Micah Johnson joined us to present a s...

228. Jack Schneider and Jennifer Berkshire with Diane Ravitch: The Threat to Public Education and the Future of School

March 25, 2021 19:20 - 1 hour - 60.5 MB

Betsy DeVos may be the most prominent face of the seeming push to dismantle public education, but educational policy experts Jennifer Berkshire and Jack Schneider believe she’s part of a larger movement that’s been steadily gaining power for decades. While support for public education today is stronger than ever, Berkshire and Schneider argue, the movement to save our schools remains fragmented, variable, and voluntary while those who seem set on tearing down the public school system are uni...

227. Jesse Hagopian and Denisha Jones: Black Lives Matter at School

March 17, 2021 22:55 - 1 hour - 56.6 MB

How can educators help destroy entrenched inequalities and enact the values of Black Lives Matter in their classrooms, schools, and communities? Jesse Hagopian and Denisha Jones, both educators and members of the Black Lives Matter at School movement, joined us to discuss this question. They believe that the United States is in the midst of an urgent moral and legal crisis over the safety, liberty, and well-being of Black young people. In an edited collection, Black Lives Matter at Scho...

226. Sara Sinclair with Gladys Radek and Althea Guiboche: Voices from Indigenous North America

March 11, 2021 01:25 - 59 minutes - 55.6 MB

“Over the last three years in cities and on reserves and reservations across the continent, I have listened to Native people’s stories of loss, injustice and resilience. They are stories that echo Chief Peguis’ story. In myriad ways, each narrator’s life had been shaped by that same struggle: how to share space with a settler nation whose essential aim is to take all that is ours.” These are words from an article oral historian Sara Sinclair wrote for Salon last year, speaking about her mi...

225. Julia Gillard and Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala with Jacqueline Miller: Real Lessons from Women in National Leadership

March 04, 2021 21:24 - 59 minutes - 55.2 MB

Women make up fewer than ten percent of national leaders worldwide, and behind this eye-opening statistic lies a pattern of unequal access to power. Julie Gillard and Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, both political leaders in their own countries, set about exploring this gender bias in their book Women and Leadership: Real Lives, Real Lessons. Gillard and Okonjo-Iweala joined us to discuss the conversations they had with internationally recognized women leaders, including Jacinda Ardern, Hillary Rodh...

224. Virtual Civic Cocktail—The State of Our Democracy: Next Steps for the Republican Party

February 25, 2021 02:49 - 46 minutes - 43.2 MB

What’s ahead for Republicans, Democracts, and Independents when it comes to civics in our country and communities? How can we work together when parties are often divided themselves? This February Civic Cocktail is the first of an intended multi-part, multi-party series. Join CityClub as they explore a few—certainly not all—of the varying viewpoints within the Republican Party with a discussion between the Lincoln Project co-founder Rick Wilson and local Republican leader Bill Bryant, mod...

224. Civic Cocktail—The State of Our Democracy: Part 1 – Next Steps for the Republican Party

February 25, 2021 02:49 - 46 minutes - 43.2 MB

What’s ahead for Republicans, Democracts, and Independents when it comes to civics in our country and communities? How can we work together when parties are often divided themselves? This February Civic Cocktail is the first of an intended multi-part, multi-party series. Join CityClub as they explore a few—certainly not all—of the varying viewpoints within the Republican Party with a discussion between the Lincoln Project co-founder Rick Wilson and local Republican leader Bill Bryant, mod...

223. Thom Hartmann: The Hidden History of the American Oligarchy

February 18, 2021 00:12 - 1 hour - 59.5 MB

The United States was born in a struggle against the oligarchs of the British aristocracy, and ever since then the history of America has been one of dynamic tension between democracy and oligarchy, asserts author Thom Hartmann. And much like the shock of the 1929 crash woke America up to glaring inequality and the ongoing theft of democracy by that generation’s oligarchs, Hartmann believes that the coronavirus pandemic of 2020 has laid bare how extensively oligarchs have looted our nation’s...

222. Sarah Jaffe with Kathi Weeks: How Devotion to Our Jobs Keeps Us Exploited, Exhausted, and Alone

February 10, 2021 22:12 - 1 hour - 56.4 MB

You’re told that if you “do what you love, you’ll never work a day in your life.” Whether it’s working for “exposure” and “experience,” or enduring poor treatment in the name of “being part of the family,” all employees are pushed to make sacrifices for the privilege of being able to do what we love. But Sarah Jaffe, a preeminent voice on labor, inequality, and social movements tells us that work won’t love us back, and advocates for the liberating power of recognizing that. In conversatio...

221. John Ghazvinian: A History of America and Iran, From Allies to Adversaries

February 03, 2021 05:47 - 59 minutes - 55 MB

How did the US and Iran lapse from a once-friendly relationship to that of hostile enemies? Historian John Ghazvinian joined us to discuss the answer, the two-centuries-long entwined histories of Iran and America. With support from his book America and Iran: A History, 1720 to Present, he shared years of archival research to lead us through the four seasons of US-Iran relations: the “spring” of mutual fascination; the “summer” of early interactions; the “autumn” of close strategic ties; an...

220. Astra Taylor with E. Tammy Kim: The Case for Economic Disobedience and Debt Abolition

January 28, 2021 01:48 - 58 minutes - 54.4 MB

Even before a national pandemic that sent the country into a crisis, almost 40% of Americans wouldn’t be able to cover a $400 emergency. Nearly a third of Americans have medical debt, and over half have defaulted on it. Student loan debt has surpassed $1.6 trillion, and the average college graduate has $32,000 in student loans, going up every year. The Debt Collective argues that access to debt has masked stagnating wages and deepening inequality, and they join us with a call to action. Do...

219. Elliott Young with Mayra Machado: How the United States Made the World’s Largest Immigrant Detention System

January 22, 2021 21:46 - 1 hour - 57.1 MB

Today over half a million immigrants are caged each year, some serving indefinite terms in what history professor Elliott Young argues is the world’s most extensive immigrant detention system. These men, women, and children remain almost completely without rights, unprotected by law and the Constitution, and their status as outsiders, even though many have lived and worked in this country for years, has left them vulnerable to the most extreme forms of state power. Young offered a broad hi...

218. Michael Eric Dyson with Robin DiAngelo: Reckoning with Race in America

January 13, 2021 20:59 - 1 hour - 75.2 MB

The night of May 25, 2020 changed America. George Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, was killed during an arrest in Minneapolis when a white cop suffocated him. The video of that night’s events went viral, sparking the largest protests in the nation’s history and the sort of social unrest we have not seen since the sixties. While Floyd’s death was certainly the catalyst, many believe it was the fuse that lit a powder keg that has been filling since America’s promising but perilous beginning. ...

217. Tamara Payne: An Unprecedented Portrait of the Life of Malcolm X

December 17, 2020 07:42 - 1 hour - 56.4 MB

In 1990, Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Les Payne embarked on a nearly thirty-year-long quest to interview anyone he could find who had actually known Malcolm X. His goal was ambitious: to transform what would become over a hundred hours of interviews into an unprecedented portrait of Malcolm X, one that would separate fact from fiction. Following Payne’s unexpected death in 2018, his daughter Tamara Payne heroically completed the biography. Presented by the Northwest Afri...

216. Steve Davis with Chelsea Clinton: Channeling Outrage to Spark Practical Activism

December 09, 2020 21:38 - 1 hour - 56.5 MB

It feels like every day there’s something new to be outraged about, or a new piece of information about something that is already outrageous. But how can those feelings of outrage be used productively to create real change? Global social innovation leader Steve Davis believes he has the answer. In order to provide guidance on harnessing our outrage, Davis joined us in conversation with author and global health advocate Chelsea Clinton to discuss the ideas shared in his book Undercurrents:...

215. The History of Housing Segregation Today: How the Legacy of Redlining Impacts Seattle’s Housing Crisis

December 03, 2020 03:43 - 1 hour - 88 MB

Segregation in America—the incessant kind that continues to dog our major cities and has contributed to so much recent social strife—is the byproduct of explicit government policies at the local, state, and federal levels, researcher Richard Rothstein argues. He believes this is especially true for the racial segregation in our neighborhoods. In this presentation with the Housing Development Consortium of Seattle-King County, Rothstein joined us to share findings from his book The Color o...

214. Eddie Cole with Shaun Scott: Campus Activism and the Struggle for Black Freedom

November 25, 2020 19:50 - 58 minutes - 54.3 MB

College campuses in the mid-twentieth century are an oft-forgotten battle ground in the fight for (and against) civil rights. Professor Dr. Eddie Cole believes the role of campus activism in the fight for social equality has been overlooked. In conversation with writer and historian Shaun Scott, Cole joined us with findings from his meticulously researched new book The Campus Color Line: College Presidents and the Struggle for Black Freedom. Focusing on the period between 1948 and 1968, h...

213. Ronald Chew with Naomi Ishisaka: My Unforgotten Seattle

November 19, 2020 06:00 - 55 minutes - 52 MB

For more than five decades, Ron Chew has fought for Asian American and social justice causes in Seattle. He joined us for this livestreamed presentation to share stories from his deeply personal memoir My Unforgotten Seattle. In conversation with journalist Naomi Ishisaka, Chew documented the tight-knit community he remembers, describing small family shops, chop suey restaurants, and sewing factories now vanished. He untangled the mystery of his extended family’s journey to America during...

212. Derek W. Black with Katherine Dunn: Public Education and the Assault on American Democracy

November 15, 2020 05:20 - 1 hour - 56.9 MB

From funding, to vouchers, to charter schools, public education policy has become a political football. Many feel that we are in the midst of a full-scale attack on our nation’s commitment to public education. And constitutional law scholar Derek W. Black contends that this assault threatens not just public education, but democracy itself. In this livestreamed presentation, Black shared from his book Schoolhouse Burning: Public Education and the Assault on American Democracy. He offered an...

211. Senator Sherrod Brown with Dow Constantine: Eight Progressive Senators Who Changed America

November 04, 2020 02:57 - 56 minutes - 52.4 MB

Hugo Black, Glen Taylor, George McGovern, Robert F. Kennedy, Herbert Lehman, Theodore Francis Green, Al Gore, William Proxmire, Sherrod Brown. Did you know the common thread is a desk? Current desk occupant and Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown joined us to share stories of those who preceded him. Utilizing anecdotes and history from his book Desk 88: Eight Progressive Senators Who Changed America, he presented eight portraits of political courage that tell the triumphs and failures of the Progr...

210. Laila Lalami with Viet Thanh Nguyen: Conditional Citizens

October 29, 2020 23:44 - 1 hour - 58 MB

What does it mean to be an American? Author Laila Lalami joinsed us to discuss this question in conversation with fellow author Viet Thanh Nguyen. Drawing from her book Conditional Citizen, she recounted her unlikely journey from Moroccan immigrant to US citizen, using it as a starting point for her exploration of the rights, liberties, and protections that are traditionally associated with American citizenship. Tapping into history, politics, and literature, she interrogated how white supre...

209. Andrew Imbrie with Jen Psaki: Power on the Precipice—The Six Choices America Faces in a Turbulent World

October 21, 2020 21:53 - 57 minutes - 53.3 MB

Is America fated to decline as a great power? Can it recover? Foreign policy expert Andrew Imbrie joined us in conversation with former White House communications director Jen Psaki to weigh in on exactly these questions. With absorbing insight from his book Power on the Precipice: The Six Choices America Faces in a Turbulent World, Andrew introduced an essential guide to renewing American leadership. Though it may seem as though the United States is either destined for continued dominanc...

208. Ambassador Capricia Marshall with Thomas Corrigan: The Power of Diplomacy

October 14, 2020 23:28 - 1 hour - 61 MB

History often appears to consist of big gestures and dramatic shifts. But for every peace treaty signed, someone set the stage, using diplomacy to effect the outcome. Nobody knows this better than Capricia Marshall. Ambassador Marshall joined us to share unvarnished anecdotes from her time as the chief of protocol for President Obama. Pulling from her book Protocol: The Power of Diplomacy and How to Make It Work for You, she told the story of harrowing near misses, exhilarating triumphs, ...

207. Combating Hate: Empathy Through Storytelling

October 08, 2020 01:05 - 1 hour - 82.5 MB

World Without Hate seeks to replace hate and violence with empathy and love, restoring peace through storytelling and empathy education. They called together a panel of speakers from different storytelling backgrounds exploring the ways that empathy and stories help us connect with others. Through the transformative power of compassion, World Without Hate invited us to renew feelings of hope and empowerment in the face of divisive rhetoric and rising hate crimes across our nation. Come to...

206. Senator Chris Murphy with Eric Liu: The Violence Inside Us

October 01, 2020 19:42 - 56 minutes - 52.1 MB

Many in America do not feel safe in spaces that used to be seen as refuges: our churches and schools, our movie theaters and dance clubs, our workplaces and neighborhoods. But this feeling begs the question: Is America destined to always be a violent nation? Pulling from his carefully researched and deeply emotional book The Violence Inside Us: A Brief History of an Ongoing American Tragedy, Senator Chris Murphy joined us via livestream to attempt to answer this question. Telling the story...

205. Alice Wong with Elsa Sjunneson: Disability Visibility in the Twenty-First Century

September 22, 2020 00:38 - 59 minutes - 55.4 MB

One in five people in the United States lives with a disability. Some disabilities are visible, others less apparent—but all are underrepresented in media and popular culture. Just in time for the thirtieth anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, activist Alice Wong joined us via livestream in conversation with editor Elsa Sjunneson. Wong shared from her recent book, Disability Visibility: First-Person Stories from the Twenty-First Century, a curated anthology of contemporary ...

204. Thom Hartmann: The Hidden History of Monopolies

September 14, 2020 08:00 - 1 hour - 60.1 MB

American monopolies dominate, control, and consume most of the energy of our entire economic system–but we’ve broken the hold of behemoths like these before, author Thom Hartmann says, and we can do it again. In this livestreamed presentation, Hartmann shared how he believes monopolies threaten our systems and economy, and the damage that they have done to so many industries and individuals, pulling from his new book The Hidden History of Monopolies: How Big Business Destroyed the American...

203. Suzanne Nossel with Dinaw Mengestu: Defending Free Speech for All

September 01, 2020 08:00 - 1 hour - 58.2 MB

Online trolls and fascist chat groups. Controversies over campus lectures. Cancel culture versus censorship. The daily hazards and debates surrounding free speech dominate headlines and fuel social media storms. In our highly digitized society, free speech is often invoked as a concept but rarely understood. Suzanne Nossel, a leading voice in support of free expression, joins us to deliver a user’s guide for free speech. In a livestreamed conversation with writer Dinaw Mengestu, Nossel dre...

202. Bob Wodnik and Joni Earl: Sound Transit’s Fight to Save the Light Rail

April 08, 2020 08:00 - 1 hour - 61.8 MB

Observing its bustling stations today, it is difficult to picture Seattle and surrounding cities without Sound Transit—let alone imagine the agency teetering near collapse. But, as Bob Wodnik and Joni Earl recall, in 1996 the fledgling light rail program’s extended timetable and inflated budget led to a torrent of angry taxpayers and public ridicule. Wodnik and Earl took us back to this fraught era of Seattle public transit, drawing from Wodnik’s book Back on Track: Sound Transit’s Fight to ...

202: Bob Wodnik and Joni Earl: Sound Transit’s Fight to Save the Light Rail

April 08, 2020 08:00 - 1 hour - 61.8 MB

Observing its bustling stations today, it is difficult to picture Seattle and surrounding cities without Sound Transit—let alone imagine the agency teetering near collapse. But, as Bob Wodnik and Joni Earl recall, in 1996 the fledgling light rail program’s extended timetable and inflated budget led to a torrent of angry taxpayers and public ridicule. Wodnik and Earl took us back to this fraught era of Seattle public transit, drawing from Wodnik’s book Back on Track: Sound Transit’s Fight to ...

201: E.J. Dionne with Ross Reynolds: Uniting Progressives and Moderates to Save Our Country

April 01, 2020 08:00 - 59 minutes - 55.4 MB

Broad and principled opposition to Donald Trump’s presidency has drawn millions of previously disengaged citizens to the public square and to the ballot boxes. Journalist E.J. Dionne stepped up to Town Hall’s stage to comment on this inspired and growing activism for social and political change—an outpouring of engagement which hasn’t been seen since the days of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal policies and the Progressive and Civil Rights movements. He draws from his book Code Red: How Progres...

201. E.J. Dionne with Ross Reynolds: Uniting Progressives and Moderates to Save Our Country

April 01, 2020 08:00 - 59 minutes - 55.4 MB

Broad and principled opposition to Donald Trump’s presidency has drawn millions of previously disengaged citizens to the public square and to the ballot boxes. Journalist E.J. Dionne stepped up to Town Hall’s stage to comment on this inspired and growing activism for social and political change—an outpouring of engagement which hasn’t been seen since the days of Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal policies and the Progressive and Civil Rights movements. He draws from his book Code Red: How Progres...

200: Conor Dougherty with Alan Durning: The Fight for Housing in America

March 18, 2020 08:00 - 1 hour - 64.5 MB

Spacious and affordable homes used to be the hallmark of American prosperity. But according to journalist Conor Dougherty, punishing rents and the increasingly prohibitive cost of ownership have turned housing into the foremost symbol of inequality and an economy gone wrong. Dougherty lead us on a fact-finding expedition to the West Coast epicenter of America’s housing crisis with perspectives from his book Golden Gates: Fighting For Housing In America. He was joined in conversation with Ala...

200. Conor Dougherty with Alan Durning: The Fight for Housing in America

March 18, 2020 08:00 - 1 hour - 64.5 MB

Spacious and affordable homes used to be the hallmark of American prosperity. But according to journalist Conor Dougherty, punishing rents and the increasingly prohibitive cost of ownership have turned housing into the foremost symbol of inequality and an economy gone wrong. Dougherty lead us on a fact-finding expedition to the West Coast epicenter of America’s housing crisis with perspectives from his book Golden Gates: Fighting For Housing In America. He was joined in conversation with Ala...

199: Susan Fowler with Carolyn Adolph: Fighting Sexual Harassment in Silicon Valley

March 09, 2020 20:57 - 55 minutes - 51.6 MB

In 2017, twenty-five-year-old Susan Fowler came forward to discuss the sexual harassment and retaliation she’d experienced as an entry-level engineer at Uber. Her story went viral, leading to the ousting of Uber’s CEO and contributing to a wave of vigilance against sexual harassment that has been cited as a critical factor in the movements against figures such as Harvey Weinsten. Fowler made her way to Town Hall with excerpts from her memoir Whistleblower: My Journey To Silicon Valley And ...

199. Susan Fowler with Carolyn Adolph: Fighting Sexual Harassment in Silicon Valley

March 09, 2020 20:57 - 55 minutes - 51.6 MB

In 2017, twenty-five-year-old Susan Fowler came forward to discuss the sexual harassment and retaliation she’d experienced as an entry-level engineer at Uber. Her story went viral, leading to the ousting of Uber’s CEO and contributing to a wave of vigilance against sexual harassment that has been cited as a critical factor in the movements against figures such as Harvey Weinsten. Fowler made her way to Town Hall with excerpts from her memoir Whistleblower: My Journey To Silicon Valley And ...

198: Milenko Matanovič: The Case for Everyday Democracy

March 05, 2020 09:00 - 1 hour - 68.9 MB

“The right of the people peaceably to assemble” is guaranteed in the First Amendment of the US constitution. Thanks to that right, every day thousands of community meetings are able to take place throughout the country where we, the people, shape decisions for the future. Community organizer Milenko Matanovič joined us at Town Hall to help us make the most of our opportunities to gather. He drew on insight from his book The Case For Everyday Democracy: Turning Community Meetings Into Engines...

198. Milenko Matanovič: The Case for Everyday Democracy

March 05, 2020 09:00 - 1 hour - 68.9 MB

“The right of the people peaceably to assemble” is guaranteed in the First Amendment of the US constitution. Thanks to that right, every day thousands of community meetings are able to take place throughout the country where we, the people, shape decisions for the future. Community organizer Milenko Matanovič joined us at Town Hall to help us make the most of our opportunities to gather. He drew on insight from his book The Case For Everyday Democracy: Turning Community Meetings Into Engines...

197. Karen Sherman with Dr. Rosita Van Coevorden: Building Hope and Opportunity for Women in Rwanda

March 03, 2020 23:42 - 1 hour - 60 MB

After a twenty-five-year career spent fighting for women’s rights around the globe, author Karen Sherman moved to Rwanda with her three sons to oversee the construction of a first-of-its-kind women’s opportunity center. Sherman made her way to Town Hall to tell the story of valiant women who survived the Rwandan genocide with insight from her book Brick by Brick: Building Hope and Opportunity for Women Survivors Everywhere. In conversation with physician and volunteer Dr. Rosita Van Coevo...

197: Karen Sherman with Dr. Rosita Van Coevorden: Building Hope and Opportunity for Women in Rwanda

March 03, 2020 23:42 - 1 hour - 60 MB

After a twenty-five-year career spent fighting for women’s rights around the globe, author Karen Sherman moved to Rwanda with her three sons to oversee the construction of a first-of-its-kind women’s opportunity center. Sherman made her way to Town Hall to tell the story of valiant women who survived the Rwandan genocide with insight from her book Brick by Brick: Building Hope and Opportunity for Women Survivors Everywhere. In conversation with physician and volunteer Dr. Rosita Van Coevo...

196. Nick Buccola: Baldwin, Buckley, and the Debate Over Race in America

February 28, 2020 00:12 - 1 hour - 77.8 MB

On February 18, 1965, an overflowing crowd in Cambridge, England gathered to witness a televised debate between James Baldwin, the leading literary voice of the civil rights movement, and William F. Buckley Jr., a fierce critic of the movement and America’s most influential conservative intellectual. The topic was “the American dream is at the expense of the American Negro.” Drawing from his book The Fire Is Upon Us, political scientist Nicholas Buccola brought us the full story of this hist...

196: Nick Buccola: Baldwin, Buckley, and the Debate Over Race in America

February 28, 2020 00:12 - 1 hour - 77.8 MB

On February 18, 1965, an overflowing crowd in Cambridge, England gathered to witness a televised debate between James Baldwin, the leading literary voice of the civil rights movement, and William F. Buckley Jr., a fierce critic of the movement and America’s most influential conservative intellectual. The topic was “the American dream is at the expense of the American Negro.” Drawing from his book The Fire Is Upon Us, political scientist Nicholas Buccola brought us the full story of this hist...

195: Thom Hartmann with Pramila Jayapal: The Hidden War on Voting

February 25, 2020 17:56 - 1 hour - 79.2 MB

Donald Trump was elected by only 26 percent of eligible voters. In America today, only a slim majority of people register to vote and a large percentage of registered voters don’t bother to show up at all. And according to progressive radio host Thom Hartmann, this low turnout is unfortunately not a bug in our system—it’s a feature. Hartmann joined us at Town Hall to demystify strategies and tactics that conservative elites in our country have used to protect their interests by preventing ...

195. Thom Hartmann with Pramila Jayapal: The Hidden War on Voting

February 25, 2020 17:56 - 1 hour - 79.2 MB

Donald Trump was elected by only 26 percent of eligible voters. In America today, only a slim majority of people register to vote and a large percentage of registered voters don’t bother to show up at all. And according to progressive radio host Thom Hartmann, this low turnout is unfortunately not a bug in our system—it’s a feature. Hartmann joined us at Town Hall to demystify strategies and tactics that conservative elites in our country have used to protect their interests by preventing ...

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